Difference between revisions of "Brand mark"

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This pattern was most often seen in powerful or rich persons - kings and queens.  
 
This pattern was most often seen in powerful or rich persons - kings and queens.  
 
However, common people are also likely to be buried with products bearing their names. The practice of marking burial places with a person's brand or crest continues to this day (e.g. crypt or tombstone). So does the practice of burial with grave belongings. (A. Lee, J. Yang, R. Mizerski, C. Lambert 2015, s. 25)
 
However, common people are also likely to be buried with products bearing their names. The practice of marking burial places with a person's brand or crest continues to this day (e.g. crypt or tombstone). So does the practice of burial with grave belongings. (A. Lee, J. Yang, R. Mizerski, C. Lambert 2015, s. 25)
 
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 
* J.E. Rowley, [[Information]] [[Marketing]] (2017), Taylor & Francis,
 
* J.E. Rowley, [[Information]] [[Marketing]] (2017), Taylor & Francis,
 +
* A. Lee, J. Yang, R. Mizerski, C. Lambert, The [[Strategy]] of Global Branding and Brand Equity (2015), Routledge.

Revision as of 21:27, 12 October 2019


Brand mark - according to J. E. Rowley, this is a brand element that is not represented in words. Most often we are using symbols or design. For example, the symbols used to denote many car or phone brands. The most popular brand marks are the yellow arches of McDonald's or the Microsoft Windows symbol. These can also be registered as trademarks.

Brand identifiers

A brand mark is an element of the brand identifiers which consists of also brand name, trademark, trade name.

  • A brand name is its hallmark which we can recognise the company. It is a part of brand identifiers that we can speak, including words, letters or numbers. A brand name is the most important identifier of products, e.g. Coca Cola, Pepsi,
  • A trademark is a legal designation in the form of a brand name, symbol or logo that is registered and shielded for the owner's sole use. Companies can register small sounds, product shapes and packages as well as brand names and logos. For examples the apple for the iPhone, the Nike symbol, and the Shell seashell,
  • A trade name is a full and legal name of a company, like Lever Brothers, Cadbury's. A trade name may or may not be a part of brand identification. (J. E. Rowley 2017, s. 96)

Marks of ownership

As A. Lee, J. Yang, R. Mizerski, C. Lambert said, people have been putting marks on their objects since humans could make understandable marks. The earliest marks used to goods were more marks of ownership than marks of trade. Primordial marks of ownership that survive tend to be found on durable stone or pottery goods.

A brand to mark ownership identifies the holder. This also serves to exhort others to keep their hands off the marked items. To this day people tend to mark their more treasured objects, often using their name or monogram or another identifying mark. Even kids write their names on their favourite toys and books. Having an ownership mark on a belonging also has the advantage of helping lost property find its way back to the owner.

Marks of ownership that endured time include crests signifying the resident of ancient tombs. Often these crests become brands themselves - e.g. when attached to the royal family.

Occupants of these tombs are buried with merchandise bearing their insignias, monograms, coats of arms, seals or names to mean the ownership of the items.

This pattern was most often seen in powerful or rich persons - kings and queens. However, common people are also likely to be buried with products bearing their names. The practice of marking burial places with a person's brand or crest continues to this day (e.g. crypt or tombstone). So does the practice of burial with grave belongings. (A. Lee, J. Yang, R. Mizerski, C. Lambert 2015, s. 25)

References

  • J.E. Rowley, Information Marketing (2017), Taylor & Francis,
  • A. Lee, J. Yang, R. Mizerski, C. Lambert, The Strategy of Global Branding and Brand Equity (2015), Routledge.