Interim financing

Interim financing
See also


Interim financing, also called gap financing or bridge loan, is the process of obtaining temporary term financing to close a transaction. Usually, it is a short-term loan arranged to cover a company's cash needs until a long-term loan is finalized[1].

Interim financing is intended to support the transaction, until to arranging permanent financing [2].

Bridge loans can be obtained by individuals, or corporations, and they can be structured of different ways. Fundamentally, interim financial is way to fill time gap, when the capital is needed to accomplish a current and a future objective. It is a way to fill the financial space between point A and B where funds may be insufficient[3].

Interim financing in business[edit]

The companies can get funding to finished a current project and start creating revenues. This allows them not to take funds from other projects. There are cases of interim financing where companies uses grants or other types of financial assistance, but generally this concept refers to loans. The companies can get funding to finished a current project and start creating revenues. This allows them not to take funds from other projects. There are cases of interim financing where companies uses grants or other types of financial assistance, but generally this concept refers to loans. The most frequently type of interim financing is a short term loan. These loans can be prepared so that the borrower will pay back the entire of the loan with all of its interest in one year or less from the loan issue date. This is the opposite of long term financing[4].

Interim financing in Real Estate[edit]

The buyer may turn to interim financial as a bridge loan, if he has a delay between the purchase of one property and sale another property. Then, lenders offer real estate bridge loans with very good credit ratings and low debt-to-income ratios. Bridge loans include the mortgages of both property together and giving the buyer time flexibility until the first real estate is sold. But usually, the lenders offer interim financial only when the worth of the combined value of the two properties is 80%, it is meaning that the borrower must have significant home equity in the original property or ample cash savings[5]. In the case of real estate investments, the developer, at the end of the original construction loan period, may wish to get interim financing rather than permanent financing, because maybe interest rates will fall in the future, or the investment plans have changed.

Advantages and disadvantages of Interim financing[edit]

The main advantages of interim financing are:

  • Interim financing may help prevent losing of chance to purchase or sale of property
  • In contrast to traditional loans, a bridge loans have a faster application, approval and funding process
  • Most of the interim financing does not provide repayment penalties.

The most important disadvantages of interim financing are:

  • relatively short terms
  • high interest rates
  • large origination fees.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. Evans D., Evans O.W. 2007
  2. Scott D.L. 2003
  3. Leary P. 2016
  4. Evans D., Evans O.W. 2007
  5. Leary P. 2016

References[edit]

Author: Weronika Wielochowska