Design life

Design life
See also

The design life is the lifespan of the object. This is the period between the creation of the product and the moment when the product is worn out and not able to work. Designers should keep in mind how important all the components are to the target product. There are products that are constructed in such a way that their rye is as long as possible. They are expensive and luxurious goods. This is due to the precise production and selection of well-grade components. It happens that products made in the best possible way are used by consumers longer than expected by the product. This is due to good use and care of the object. The designers who watch over us in the process of preparing the object for production play an important role. A number of

  • spacecraft,
  • artificial satellites
  • some public transport vehicles fall qualitatively in this category.

Basic goods usually have a shorter life expectancy. This is due to minimizing costs and getting cheaper, which in turn means worse components. By comparing the same product but at a different price, you can see that the more expensive product will have a longer life. This is also related to the process of planning, as savings are not at the same level as a comparable item. The economics of cheaper items boils down to the fact that the service life is equal to the warranty period offered by the manufacturer [1] [2].

Obsolescence[edit]

Design life is associated with the concept of coded aging of the product. However, in the world of fast-growing technology, this concept changes its meaning. Digital cameras are a good example. From year to year, new models and their functionalities are created. The camera, which is in a great technical condition and will serve the consumer for many years, becomes an old model in the rush of technological innovations. It is the subject of the road, so it will maintain good technical condition for a long time, making beautiful pictures. The speed imposed by today's world is prompting manufacturers of digital cameras to manufacture new cameras that will match or become better than the latest product of a competitive company [3].

Footnotes[edit]

  1. Cao. H , Folan. P (2007), Product Life Cycle: the evolution of a paradigm and literature review from 1950-2009., Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  2. Papanek .V, (2005), Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change, Chicago Review Press; 2nd Revised ed. edition p.69
  3. Bulow. J, (1986), An Economic Theory of Planned Obsolescence,The Quarterly Journal of Economics. Oxford University Press, p. 729–749

References[edit]

  • Bulow. J, (1986), An Economic Theory of Planned Obsolescence,The Quarterly Journal of Economics. Oxford University Press, p. 729–749
  • Cao. H , Folan. P (2007), Product Life Cycle: the evolution of a paradigm and literature review from 1950-2009., Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • Papanek .V, (2005), Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change, Chicago Review Press; 2nd Revised ed. edition p.69
  • Road. K, Kilbride. K (2015) Design life of buildings A scoping study , Scottish Building Standards Agency
  • Savickas. M, Rossier. J, Dauwalder. J, Duarte. M, Guichard. J, Soresi. S, Van Esbroeck. R, Van Vianen. A ,(2009),Life designing: A paradigm for career construction in the 21st century, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 75, p. 239-250.
  • Savickas. M, (2015), Life-Design Counseling Manual, ISBN (13: 978-0-578-16546-2)

Author: Klaudia Rodak