Organization of managerial work

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Work of every manager is usually associated with the exercise of power, influence on others, and having a distinctive powers. In fact, the work of managers is a difficult and responsible task, requiring large, often multi-disciplinary skills and strong commitment. Perceptions of managerial work as just a source of power, the possibility of subordination and reaping bigger profits is always harmful to both subordinates and the organization.

Main features of managerial work

Work of managers is often associated with the implementation of the basic management functions: planning, organizing, motivating and controlling. The most important specific features of managerial work that distinguish it from other works include:

  • Conceptual in nature consists in choosing the objectives, directions and methods of operation,
  • performing generic management functions such as coordination, organization, motivation and control,
  • Risks and uncertainties of varying intensity,
  • Responsible for the management and effectiveness of physical resources and subordinate employees,
  • The variability of tasks, methods and operating conditions,
  • The lack of easily observable and measurable effects of work.
  • Managerial work can be performed outside of the office, by teleworking techniques,

Managers the responsible for appointing the organizational goals. In the case of operational managers goals relate to the current business activities (weeks, days).

Middle managers are responsible for the medium-term objectives (mostly annual perspective). Top level of management is responsible for setting the long-term goals (strategic), and ensuring development and economic benefits in the long run.

See also:


  • Agarwal, R. D. (1982). Organization and management. Tata McGraw-Hill Education.
  • Barnard, C. I., & Thompson, K. (2003). Organization and management: Selected papers (Vol. 7). Psychology Press.
  • Garvin, D. A. (1998). The processes of organization and management. MIT Sloan Management Review, 39(4), 33.
  • Kast, R. E., & Rosenzweig, J. E. (1974). Organization and management. New York.
  • Newman, W. H. (1950). Administrative action: The techniques of organization and management. Prentice-Hall.
  • Sloan School of Management | MIT OpenCourseWare website.

Author: Krzysztof Wozniak